Details

Figure 3 (click to enlarge)
Figure 3 (click to enlarge)

SwapMyRigs (SMR) maps a transceiver’s connections to a VGA cable’s 15 conductors and shield or drain. The VGA cable carries the signals to an identical SMR in the car’s passenger compartment. This remote SMR then maps the VGA conductors back to the transceiver’s connections and presents them to the control head, microphone, and speaker using RJ45 and audio jacks. RJ45 jacks are ideal because they accept 4, 6, and 8 conductor plugs. No matter what RJ (Reg­is­tered Jack) connections a manufacturer uses, the SMR’s RJ45 jacks are always compatible.

SMRs support even the most complex transceiver connections. Figure 3 shows them connecting a Kenwood TM-D710 to its remote components. Of all RJ-connected amateur transceivers, the TM-D710 requires the largest number of conections; it uses two RJ45 jacks—8 conductors each, plus audio.

Figure 4 (click to enlarge)
Figure 4 (click to enlarge)

In Figure 4, the jumper arrangement inside an SMR is visible. It shows a total of 98 staking pins arranged in 3 rows of 32 columns plus one column of 2 pins. The staking pins are connected to inputs and outputs, which can be jumpered to link each input to the conductors of the HD15 VGA jack. This particular SMR is configured for the Kenwood TM-D710. To substitute another transceiver, simply reconfigure the jumpers for its connections. Jumper configurations are contained in the Support section.

Figure 5 (click to enlarge)
Figure 5 (click to enlarge)

In Figure 5, the same SMRs are used with three significantly different radio configurations. Not only are the pinouts different for the three radios — even the two Yaesu radios — but the number of conductors for the control and microphone cables differ, as shown in Table 1.

Table 1
Number of Conductors: Control and MIC
Transceiver Control MIC
Kenwood TM-D710
Yaesu FT-857
Yaesu FTM-350
8
6
8
8
8

6

Figure 6 further demonstrates the incompatibility of manufacturers’ separation kits. Not only are the number of conductors different, but so are the pinouts. Each separation configuration is different and requires a unique cable arrangement. The SMR solves the connection problem by accepting connectors with any combination of conductors regardless of pinouts. Swapping radios only requires resetting the SMRs’ internal jumpers.

mic_pinouts
Figure 6